WASHINGTON 2020

WASHINGTON 2020

The E-Cigarette Summit US 2020 Program

The 2020 program is currently being curated.  The 2019 program is available in a printable PDF version here.

WELCOME

7:45 am - 8:15 am

Registration and Refreshments

8:15 am - 8:20 am

Welcome from the Chair

EVIDENCE & REGULATORY FRAMEWORKS

8:20 am - 8:35 am

Opening Address: Tobacco Control, Harm Reduction and Science: Integrity is our most important asset

  • Prof Steven A. Schroeder MD Distinguished Professor of Health and Healthcare - University of California, San Francisco & Director, Smoking Cessation Leadership Center

8:35 am - 8:50 am

Title and synopsis to follow

  • Matthew R. Holman Director, Office of Science (OS),Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) - U.S. Food and Drug Administration

8:50 am - 9:05 am

Title and synopsis to follow

9:05 am - 9:20 am

Title and synopsis to follow

  • Andy Hyland Scientific Principal Investigator - PATH Study Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

9:20 am - 9:35 am

“Monitoring the Future” – Marijuana and vaping trends

  • Prof Richard Miech Principal Investigator, Monitoring the Future - Institute for Social Research, Universithy of Michigan

9:35 am - 9:50 am

Title and synopsis to follow

  • Prof Andrea Villanti Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology - Vermont Center on Behavior & Health, at the University of Vermont

9:50 am - 10:10 am

Panel discussion and Q&A: What are the key considerations for prudent regulation of e-cigarettes?

Discussion topics to follow

  • Prof Steven A. Schroeder MD Distinguished Professor of Health and Healthcare - University of California, San Francisco & Director, Smoking Cessation Leadership Center
  • Matthew R. Holman Director, Office of Science (OS),Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) - U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • Deborah Arnott Chief Executive - Action on Smoking and Health (UK)
  • Andy Hyland Scientific Principal Investigator - PATH Study Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Prof Richard Miech Principal Investigator, Monitoring the Future - Institute for Social Research, Universithy of Michigan
  • Prof Andrea Villanti Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology - Vermont Center on Behavior & Health, at the University of Vermont

10:10 am - 10:30 am

Morning Refreshment Break

Health Effects

10:30 am - 10:45 am

Devaluing combusted products

This presentation will describe the importance of examining how to “devalue” combusted products to facilitate the uptake of less harmful nicotine-containing products (e.g., electronic cigarettes), the importance of regulating e-cigarettes, and the need to develop more effective nicotine replacement therapies.   The presentation will be framed in the context of the continuum of risk of nicotine-containing products.  To date, too little attention has been paid to how to alter the most deadly and addictive tobacco product, cigarettes, to reduce their use. Devaluing the combusted products could include reducing their appeal (e.g., eliminating characterizing flavors, sugars) and/or addictiveness (e.g., reducing nicotine in cigarettes).   This approach would facilitate the shift towards harm reduction products among smoker unwilling or unable to quit nicotine.  However, attention needs to be paid to the concerns associated with harm reduction products, particularly e-cigarettes.  These concerns include addicting youth to nicotine, serving as a gateway to combusted products and dissuading smokers from quitting nicotine products altogether.  Potential ways to allay these concerns surround e-cigarettes involve establishing product standards, reducing access and promotion to youth and more proactively discussing and providing treatments for the cessation of all nicotine containing products.  Finding more effective treatments for smoking and for cessation of e-cigarette use is clearly needed to shift smokers down to the products with the lowest risk and optimally to nicotine abstinence.

  • Prof Dorothy Hatsukami Professor, Department of Psychiatry - Associate Director of Cancer Prevention and Control for the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota

10:45 am - 11:00 am

Toxicology of nicotine vapor and cannabis

  • Prof Neal L. Benowitz Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering & Theapeutic Sciences - University of California, San Franciso

11:00 am - 11:15 am

Does nicotine harm the developing brain?

Despite a number of potential neurotoxins in tobacco smoke, few concerns were raised about effects of smoking on the developing brain. The claim that nicotine harms developing brain, however, became the dominant concern about vaping. The close links between smoking and social disadvantage and poor mental health were generally considered to be due to smoking having a stronger appeal for people whose lives are more stressful, rather than due to smoking causing mental health problems. The direction of causality could however go in either direction. This presentation will review studies that can clarify the causality regarding links between smoking and lower IQ and educational achievement, and between smoking and increased risk of ADHD, anti-social behaviour, autism and use of illegal drugs. The talk will also consider evidence that people who start smoking earlier become heavier and more dependent smokers, and whether this also applies to nicotine on its own, when not combined with other tobacco chemicals.

  • Prof Peter Hajek Professor of Clinical Psychology - Queen Mary University of London

11:15 am - 11:30 am

Has protecting youth overshadowed the opportunity to help smokers – how to strike the right balance?

  • Dr. Nancy A. Rigotti, MD Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School - Director, Tobacco Research & Treatment Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

11:30 am - 11:40 am

Reaching consensus

  • Professor Ann McNeill Professor of Tobacco Addiction - UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), Kings College London

11:40 am - 12:30 pm

Panel interview

Panel interview Chaired by Prof Jasjit S. Ahluwalia

  • Prof Jasjit S. Ahluwalia Professor, Behavioural and Social Sciences & Internal Medicine - Brown University, School of Public Health & Alpert School of Medicine
  • Prof Dorothy Hatsukami Professor, Department of Psychiatry - Associate Director of Cancer Prevention and Control for the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota
  • Prof Neal L. Benowitz Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering & Theapeutic Sciences - University of California, San Franciso
  • Prof Peter Hajek Professor of Clinical Psychology - Queen Mary University of London
  • Dr. Nancy A. Rigotti, MD Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School - Director, Tobacco Research & Treatment Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Professor Ann McNeill Professor of Tobacco Addiction - UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies (UKCTAS), Kings College London

TOBACCO CONTROL, INDUSTRY AND REGULATION

1:15 pm - 1:30 pm

Doing Well and Doing Good? US Tobacco Control lessons learned from the intersection of Wall Street and Washington

U.S. adult cigarette use declined to 13.7% in 2018 down from 23.5% in 1999 driven largely by political, legal, and policy actions. But some of the most dramatic year-over-year changes were driven not just by policy but also by the introduction of innovative, less-harmful products into the market. Now in 2020, investors on Wall Street are valuing tobacco companies that appear too tethered to cigarette sales lower than their peers who are innovating into lower-harm nicotine delivery systems – a powerful driver to accelerate change among the perceived laggards. This presentation will explore ways in which public health and public policy can work with capital markets to more quickly transform the tobacco industry into one that delivers far less harm to individuals and the population as a whole.

1:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

1:45 pm - 2:00 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Panel interview with Mike Cummings

  • David Graham Chief Impact Officer - NJOY
  • Jim Solyst Consultant to Swedish Match - JMS Scientific Engagement
  • Matthew R. Holman Director, Office of Science (OS),Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) - U.S. Food and Drug Administration

2:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

Competition in the nicotine vaping market with a focus on the Altria-Juul merger Altria recently purchase a 35% stake in Juul Labs, combing the largest US cigarette manufacturer with the largest US vaping product company. The deal is currently receiving antitrust scrutiny by the Federal Trade Commission. Implications of the Altria-Juul Labs merger are discussed from an antitrust standpoint, by assessing market concentration, identifying entry barriers, and examining firm conduct. Public health implications of market structure are also considered.

  • Prof David Levy Professor of Oncology - Lombardl Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University

2:45 pm - 3:05 pm

Panel Discussion and Q&A

  • Stephanie Miller Co-Founder - Sandhill Strategy
  • Pamela Kaufman Morgan Stanley
  • Clive Bates Director - Counterfactual Consulting Ltd
  • Jim Solyst Consultant to Swedish Match - JMS Scientific Engagement
  • David Graham Chief Impact Officer - NJOY
  • Matthew R. Holman Director, Office of Science (OS),Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) - U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • Prof David Levy Professor of Oncology - Lombardl Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University
  • Dr Mike Cummings Professor, Dep't Psychiatry & Behavioural Sciences - Medical University of South Carolina

PUBLIC HEALTH AND POLICY

3:25 pm - 3:40 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

3:40 pm - 3:55 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

3:55 pm - 4:10 pm

Title and synopsis to follow

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

How to communicate relative risks to the public

  • Dr Amy L. Fairchild Dean College of Public Health - The Ohio State University
  • Dr Ray Niaura Director for Science - Schroeder Institute at Truth Initiative
  • Kathleen Crosby Director, Office of Health Communication & Education - FDA Center for Tobacco Products

4:35 pm - 4:50 pm

Why I believe that vaping is reducing smoking

This talk will examine a wide variety of types of evidence, all of which are consistent with the view that vaping can reduce and is reducing smoking by increasing smoking cessation. Individually, each “piece” of evidence is noteworthy but not, in itself, definitive. Collectively, however, the consistency of the multiple forms of evidence presents a persuasive case that vaping has reduced smoking. The types of evidence include: randomized controlled trials; population studies of year-to-year changes in smoking prevalence; analyses of use of vapor products and cessation experience in national survey data sets; circumstantial evidence from rates of decrease in various countries’ annual cigarette sales data; changes in cigarette sales in jurisdictions that have adopted restrictions on sales of vapor products; trends in stock market share prices of the major cigarette manufacturers correlated with developments in vapor product policy; and economic research on the effects of vapor product policies on cigarette consumption.

  • Prof Kenneth Warner Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus - School of Public Health, University of Michigan

4:50 pm - 5:20 pm

Panel Discussion and Q&A – What is at stake

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Summary and Closing Remarks from the Chair

5:30 pm - 6:15 pm

End of Summit – Networking Drinks